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SR International: Actress And Author Sharon Stone Opens Up On Her Routine, Meditation And More

SR International: Actress And Author Sharon Stone Opens Up On Her Routine, Meditation And More

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In her latest interview in 2021, Sharon Stone reveals to WSJ. Magazine that she loves to sleep. The actor and author, 63, who lives in Los Angeles, wakes up at the last possible minute ahead of her first meetings and obligations. According to the superstar, she makes her bed, takes a quick shower and throws on a bit of makeup. She’s usually figured out what she’s going to wear the night before. Then it’s right to her home office or car, and the day begins—and no two are the same. “Nothing is set in my world,” she says of having a schedule that changes daily. “I usually bring my meditation ball and throw it in my bag, and just kind of do everything where there’s a space.” 

A True Artist: Film, Music, Writing and Painting

Though she’s best known for her iconic roles in 1990s blockbusters movies like alluring murderer Catherine Tramell in “Basic Instinct” and fiery, drug-addicted Ginger McKenna in “Casino,” Stone has also been a songwriter for years (earlier this year, she and the singer Hayley Sales released the ballad “Never Before”), and during the pandemic she returned to watercolor painting, a hobby she picked up as a college student at Pennsylvania’s Edinboro University. She also wrote a candid, often vulnerable memoir, “The Beauty of Living Twice,” published in March and named for the chapter of her life that began in 2001 after she survived a life-threatening brain hemorrhage and stroke.

In her chatty and sometimes offbeat voice, the book chronicles her upbringing in a small town in Pennsylvania; her overnight rise to fame in the 1990s; and parts of her personal life, including adopting her three sons and her philanthropy for organizations like amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research. Stone has for years spoken out on social issues, like the gender pay gap in Hollywood. 

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Photo credit: Emma Summerton/Trunk Archive | Courtesy WSJ. Magazine

For Stone, the most meaningful part of writing her life story came after the book was published. She recently took an online MasterClass taught by the novelist Walter Mosley, where he encouraged students to read their work aloud three times. “When I was reading for the audiobook…I realized what tremendous healing it was doing for me,” she says. Reading it was really putting it cellularly into my system in a new way.”

Here are some things Sharon Stone revealed to WSJ. Magazine…

On how much sleep she needs a night:

Now I need eight. Many years ago, I did a film about lucid dreaming [2007’s When a Man Falls], which was really intriguing and wonderful. I started really studying and practicing the art of lucid dreaming and lucid dreaming as a form of meditation. So I super love sleeping, and I love this opportunity to work on lucid dreaming.

On the advice she’d give for anyone curious about lucid dreaming:

Meditation is your easier way in. I’m Buddhist, and I enjoy meditating and chanting and the whole thing. Breathing is always your best way into everything in life—lucid dreaming, meditation, sanity, calmness, balance, temper, control. Breathing is the answer to all things.

On her go-to breakfast for starting the week off right:

My favorite breakfast is watermelon with feta cheese and mint, with olive oil and salt and pepper. And then I usually have a piece of gluten-free sourdough toast with that and an herbal tea. 

On her beauty routine:

Last night I was getting a really bad muscle ache, body ache, headache, and I took a bath in Dead Sea salts and arnica. And that was really, really, really helpful. So I sort of use herbs and teas as medicine. If my stomach’s upset, I drink lemon and ginger teas and peppermint teas and these kinds of gentle herb things. I’m very gentle with myself and the things that I use.

On what she does for exercise:

It depends on where I am and what my opportunities are. During Covid…I started devising different things that I just did for myself. I think squats are really important. If you do squats every day, that really does get your whole body together.

I was a martial artist when I was young. I haven’t practiced in decades, but I still like to do my punches.

I really like to swim, and I find that [the] butterfly is a really great overall workout for me, and a stroke that really works for my body overall. I like to plank, and I have [young sons] so we do planking contests to see who can plank the longest…. They can plank for half an hour.

On a line from her memoir, “Style is what you do with what’s wrong with you.”:

Well, I have really awful hair. I’m often bleaching it, obviously. I also think we’re not all built the same, so we have to figure out what works for our body type or proportion—and what works with our personality. I don’t really like to be uncomfortable, so I’m not one of those people that you’re often going to see in a bustier, uncomfortable shoes—gear that’s really hard to wear. I like clothes that are simple and clean and structurally, architecturally interesting. I like hippie kind of clothes.

On what she’s learned from her co-stars like Robert DeNiro:

I can tell you that nobody has a work ethic like Bob De Niro. His work ethic is beautiful and structured and no messing around. I absolutely loved working with him. I worked with George C. Scott and he was remarkable and fascinating, and I worked with Rod Steiger and he was overwhelming and intense. These people who are the really major players, they’ve been in so many films and produced so many important films, and just structurally they know what’s going on. It’s thrilling. By their example, you get to understand how you could become a better professional.

On what she’s most excited for as the country starts to go back to “normal”:

I’m just excited to see where I belong in the world, to see where my journey is going. I think that when I was saying all these things—that now Kamala Harris, our fabulous vice president, and Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton are now avidly discussing—about women’s rights, [it] made my film career quite difficult. People found me to be “difficult” because I was asking for those things and expecting to get those things that I felt were correct and appropriate for myself and other women. That hurt me and my standing with my colleagues in the business. What I [am waiting] to see at this point is now that [gender equality] is becoming the standard fare, [will] I be accepted back into my film community because I had that great thing that President Obama talked about, which was audacity? I was willing to bash my own head on the glass ceiling. I’m going to have to see if this wounded warrior can be accepted back into her industry or if I will have to move along somewhere else.

Photo credit: Emma Summerton/Trunk Archive | Courtesy WSJ. Magazine


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