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All About Toothbrushes: How Often Should You Change Them + Hard Vs. Soft Ones

All About Toothbrushes: How Often Should You Change Them + Hard Vs. Soft Ones

all-about-toothbrushes-how-often-should-you-change-them-hard-vs-soft-ones

P

ersonal hygiene might be personal but the results are definitely not. While you may be brushing twice a day (well done), if you’ve been using the same toothbrush for 6 months, any effort you’re putting into your overall dental care would prove abortive.

The idea of changing your toothbrush frequently is not to make rich the manufacturers, but because there are some health implications associated with it. As a result, experts advice that you should change your toothbrush every 3-4 months. Although certain factors can prompt the need for more frequent changes, in the absence of those factors, the above stated is the industry standard.

Why should I change my toothbrush often?

Photo: cottonbro | Pexels
  • Toothbrush encourages germ build up and should be changed every 3-4 months in order to prevent infections
  • If you’ve recently recovered from a flu, mouth sore or a mouth/throat infection, its’ good reason for a toothbrush change.
  • As soon as you notice frayed bristles or your toothbrush no longer stands straight, it’s time for a change.

Hard toothbrush vs soft toothbrush

all-about-toothbrushes-how-often-should-you-change-them-hard-vs-soft-ones
Photo: Ron Lach | Pexels

The type of toothbrush that is right for you depends on your specific dental care needs and any issues you might be suffering from at the time.

Having said that, in the absence of any dental issue, it is advisable to use soft to medium bristles. Hard toothbrushes wear off your teeth’s enamel and could harm your gum. Thus, it’s not beneficial in the grand scheme of things. While harder bristles are known for cleaning slightly more plaque than softer bristles, the benefits fail to outweigh the snag. When thinking of how often you should change your toothbrush, it’s expedient to note that the quality of toothbrush and overall state of health come into play.

If you still insist on using a hard toothbrush, consult your dentist for proper guidance.

Featured image: Nataliya Melnychuk | Unsplash


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